ACCIO’S HOW TO → WRITE A VILLAIN 
[[MORE]]I think what’s most important when you write a villain is that while many people think villains in literature and fiction are over the top evil, to step back and think of their real life “villains”.
Villains such as an anal boss that gripes on you about everything. 
A classmate who does nothing but sit there on Facebook and doesn’t contribute to a group project. 
A customer at work who is constantly rude to you for no reason.
While those may not seem like villains to you, they are real, complex people you probably can’t stand. 
So, with people like that in your real life in mind, you’re ready to go to create a fictional character that will be both complex, realistic, and a straight up villain. 
Here are some questions I found from this article, that I think are very important questions and advice that you should used when trying to create and write a villain. Past is always key and vital to any character so keep that in mind. A villain is not evil for the sake of it, there’s always a reason behind their actions. 
Choose a model for your villain — an ordinary person, a celebrity, a notorious criminal from the news and examine that person’s flaws and weaknesses. How have they wronged others? Discard their positive traits, magnify their negative traits, and write a brief character sketch. What’s the character’s name? What does he or she look like? What is going on in the character’s head that allows him or her to treat others with disregard?
Give your villain a shady past — what terrible things has your villain done throughout his or her life? Some villains are just trouble makers; others are deranged psychopaths. How extreme is your villain?
Identify the source — what happened to your villain to turn him or her so evil? Was your villain born that way?
Flawed villains do good things — the most interesting villains are not completely evil. They have a soft spot for puppies or they write cheesy love poems. Contrary personality traits add depth and realism to all characters. Describe your villain’s positive traits (but keep them brief!)
Put your villain in a scene — make sure you include dialogue so you can work out how your character speaks. Try to give your villain a distinct voice. Is your villain disguised as a good guy? Does your villain spend every waking minute committing evil deeds?
If you take all of this into consideration when you’re writing or creating a villain you’ll have quite a complex and realistic one on your hands which are always great things to have when you create any character good or bad. 

ACCIO’S HOW TO → WRITE A VILLAIN 

I think what’s most important when you write a villain is that while many people think villains in literature and fiction are over the top evil, to step back and think of their real life “villains”.

While those may not seem like villains to you, they are real, complex people you probably can’t stand. 

So, with people like that in your real life in mind, you’re ready to go to create a fictional character that will be both complex, realistic, and a straight up villain. 

Here are some questions I found from this article, that I think are very important questions and advice that you should used when trying to create and write a villain. Past is always key and vital to any character so keep that in mind. A villain is not evil for the sake of it, there’s always a reason behind their actions. 

  1. Choose a model for your villain — an ordinary person, a celebrity, a notorious criminal from the news and examine that person’s flaws and weaknesses. How have they wronged others? Discard their positive traits, magnify their negative traits, and write a brief character sketch. What’s the character’s name? What does he or she look like? What is going on in the character’s head that allows him or her to treat others with disregard?
  2. Give your villain a shady past — what terrible things has your villain done throughout his or her life? Some villains are just trouble makers; others are deranged psychopaths. How extreme is your villain?
  3. Identify the source — what happened to your villain to turn him or her so evil? Was your villain born that way?
  4. Flawed villains do good things — the most interesting villains are not completely evil. They have a soft spot for puppies or they write cheesy love poems. Contrary personality traits add depth and realism to all characters. Describe your villain’s positive traits (but keep them brief!)
  5. Put your villain in a scene — make sure you include dialogue so you can work out how your character speaks. Try to give your villain a distinct voice. Is your villain disguised as a good guy? Does your villain spend every waking minute committing evil deeds?

If you take all of this into consideration when you’re writing or creating a villain you’ll have quite a complex and realistic one on your hands which are always great things to have when you create any character good or bad. 

2 Jan +341
#how to #rph #rpa #writing tips #character help
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